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Why Boxing Day has nothing to do with fighting and its history

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Boxing Day offers a chance to unwind, reconnect with loved ones, and create memories that last long after the decorations are packed away [Freepik]

In contrast to its joyous neighbors, Christmas and New Year’s, Boxing Day exudes mystery. Boxing Day, which is observed on December 26 in many nations, raises questions.

Boxing Day offers a chance to unwind, reconnect with loved ones, and create memories that last long after the decorations are packed away [Freepik]

Though your mind may be filled with images of gloves and ringside cheers, this unusual festival has far gentler and more deeply ingrained roots. Now grab a cup of eggnog and let’s unravel the meaning behind the unusual name of Boxing Day.

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Determining the precise beginning of Boxing Day is akin to deciphering a historical riddle, as multiple convincing hypotheses contend for primary position. Each enriches the day’s vibrant tapestry with a fascinating dimension.

The Roman alms box

According to one hypothesis, Boxing Day originated with the Roman custom of putting boxes in churches to gather money for the underprivileged. On December 26, which is also Boxing Day, the feast day of Saint Stephen, these boxes were frequently opened.

Boxing Day offers a chance to unwind, reconnect with loved ones, and create memories that last long after the decorations are packed away [Freepik]

The prize for the servant
Another widespread misconception links Boxing Day to England’s Victorian era. Traditionally, as a thank you for their hard labor over the holidays, wealthier households would send their slaves Christmas boxes stuffed with presents, cash, and leftover food around this time.

The relationship with feast days

Ireland and Catalonia are two European nations that observe December 26 as Saint Stephen’s Day. The origins of Boxing Day customs may have come from this religious celebration that honors the first Christian martyr and frequently included eating and gift-giving activities.

From cartons to treasure
Although the precise beginnings are still a little unclear, Boxing Day has undoubtedly developed into a day full with distinctive customs of its own. It is a day on which many nations observe:

Boxing Day offers a chance to unwind, reconnect with loved ones, and create memories that last long after the decorations are packed away [Freepik]

Holiday feasts: Remaining Christmas treats are given another chance to shine, and some countries have unique Boxing Day dishes, such as the Irish St. Stephen’s Day pie or the South African bobotie.
A shopping binge is sparked by the post-Christmas sales, when retailers offer steep discounts and spirit beyond personal celebrations.

Let’s celebrate Boxing Day’s special fusion of tradition, history, and contemporary fun as we raise a glass to it. Boxing Day is a time to relax, spend time with loved ones, and make memories that will stay long after the decorations are taken down, whether you’re eating leftover turkey, supporting your favorite sports team, or volunteering in your community.

Though its name may be a little confusing, Boxing Day is all about connecting, celebrating, and giving back. It’s a valuable addition to the post-Christmas calendar.

Credit: Pulse.ng

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